Spotlights

2019 Women in Construction: Nicole Pinkham, Content Director at Erland Construction, Inc.

What are you doing differently in 2019 that has had a positive impact on your career? I think really taking the time to acknowledge your personal wins has a huge, positive impact on your career. It’s not that you need to humble, brag, or toot your own horn, but you should never downplay your success at work.

2019 Women in Construction: Atiya Rahim, Assistant Project Manager at Erland Construction, Inc.

What was your first job and what did you learn from it? My first job out of Wentworth Institute of Technology was working with a concrete contractor in Staten Island. It was not my ideal career choice, but the market was weak at the time. After working in the trailer for a few months, I was let go and scrambling to find a new job.

2019 Women in Construction: Laurie Webber, Assistant Director of Safety at Erland Construction, Inc.

What were your biggest fears when you started out in your profession? I think, like most women in construction, I feared I wouldn’t get the respect I deserved and that in this male-dominated industry, I wouldn’t be taken seriously. I also feared that becoming a mom three times over would somehow interfere with how I’d be looked at by some of my peers.

2019 Women in Construction: Haley Sabino, Field Supervisor at Erland Construction, Inc.

What was your first job and what did you learn from it? I started working in my family’s construction business at a young age. I would work on miscellaneous residential and commercial projects with my dad and my papa, whether it be brickwork, tiling, framing, or demolition.

2019 Women in Construction: Taquana Peters, MEP Junior Estimator/Quality Engineer at Erland Construction, Inc.

What were your biggest fears when you started out in your profession? My construction experience began as a field/project engineer at the Dearborn STEM Academy. One of my biggest fears was entering a predominately male dominated industry as a young woman.

2019 Women in Construction: Anette Balestrand, Assistant Project Manager at Erland Construction, Inc.

What are you doing differently in 2019 that has had a positive impact on your career? I’ve decided that 2019 will be the year that I take charge of my career and stand my ground. It’s the year where I make a difference for myself and for others around me. I believe as a woman in this industry, it is important to assert yourself.

2019 Women in Construction: Martine Dion, Principal, Director of Sustainable Design at SMMA

Which project, deal or transaction was the “game changer” in the advancement of your career during the last 10 years? I started working as the sustainable design/LEED consultant and energy efficiency specialist for National Grid in 2006, work that has continued through present day. I built on 13 years of advanced energy efficiency expertise consulting that contributed to crafting their utility incentives programs.

2019 Women in Construction: Lorraine Finnegan, Principal, Vice President, Director at SMMA

Which project, deal or transaction was the “game changer” in the advancement of your career during the last 10 years? I started working on Swampscott High School as the project architect and took over as project manager when it went into construction. The personal growth that was afforded to me during that project was tremendous.

2019 Women in Construction: Jennifer Howe, Principal, Vice President, Director at SMMA

What were your biggest fears when you started out in your profession? As a young woman in engineering, I was concerned that I might not be taken seriously or given the same opportunities as my male peers were given. Although there are always outliers, my experience at SMMA has been quite the opposite.

2019 Women in Construction: Jessica Smith, Principal, Director, Project Manager at SMMA

What were your biggest fears when you started out in your profession? When I first started, my biggest fear was the power suit! I later realized it wasn’t the power suit itself I was afraid of, but what it represented. It meant conforming in what was considered a man’s world: dressing like a man.